Pottery on the fringe

Most students living in the school hostels would go home during the Diwali holidays. But it was customary for the small group that stayed back to visit the house of Nazeeb Khan, a potter in village Gilpatti near Bathinda, Punjab. The purpose was not just to buy earthen diyas, but also to behold the processContinue reading “Pottery on the fringe”

Teaching Justice

Justice is no less challenging to teach in the classroom. An interesting way to begin is to have a role play of the dialogue that Socrates had had with a group of young people on Justice. They ask him, Why should we be just when people who tell lies, twist rules, avoid paying taxes areContinue reading “Teaching Justice”

Security Council at 75

Security Council is the most powerful UN body with 5 permanent members and 10 non-permanent members who are elected from different regions after every two years. And we all know that it is the permanent members who call the shots with the power of veto. Various attempts have been made to reform the Security CouncilContinue reading “Security Council at 75”

The need of logical thinking in schools

There was a time when there were no books. #Knowledge and #skills were transferred orally from generation to generation. You didn’t need to verify and examine knowledge so much. You just had to accept what your elders had told you. The jobs and professions were limited. Then came the print industry and along with them, #books. Information, knowledge could beContinue reading “The need of logical thinking in schools”

Dalrymple’s The Anarchy: a review

‘History is boring’ is a common refrain from students in schools. And one obvious reason is the history books have generally been written by the historians who are skilled in historiography but are unable to connect with the common reader. Very few historians have the ability to build engaging narratives in their books. And WilliamContinue reading “Dalrymple’s The Anarchy: a review”